Andrei Ruckenstein

Andrei Ruckenstein

Office: SCI, Room 255. 617-358-4791
Office: SCI, Room 321. 617-358-4791
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Research Interests:

Classical Computation, Correlated Systems, and Higher Education

My research primarily focuses on three key areas, statistical mechanics models of classical computation, strongly correlated systems, and new models for higher education. In the context of computational problems, I have worked together with my colleagues Claudio Chamon and Eduardo Mucciolo to develop a new approach to reversible classical computation by mapping a universal reversible classical logic circuit into a quantum planar vertex model that encodes the result of the computation in its ground state. In addition, I am exploring the connection between the problem of single gene transcription and classical computation. In terms of correlated systems, I am exploring models of marginal Fermi liquid behavior at Lifshitz transitions in models of correlated systems, which support the evolution from hole to electron Fermi surfaces. Finally, during my work as an University administrator I explored new models of Higher Education that address an indisputable structural issue with the current model of research-intensive universities.

Selected Publications:

“Quantum vertex model for reversible classical computing”, C. Chamon, E. R. Mucciolo, A. E. Ruckenstein, and Z.-C. Yang, Nature Communications 8, May 12, 15303 (2017).

“Thermodynamic and Kinetic Modeling of Transcriptional Pausing”, Vasisht R. Tadigotla, Daibhid O’Maoileidigh, Anirvan M. Sengupta, Vitaly Epstein, Richard H. Ebright, Evgeny Nudler, and Andrei E. Ruckenstein, PNAS 103, 4439 (2006).

“Phenomenology of the Normal State of Cu-O High-Temperature Superconductors”, C. M. Varma, P. B. Littlewood, S. Schmitt-Rink, E. Abrahams, and A. E. Ruckenstein, Phys. Rev. Lett. 63, 1996 (1989); 64, 497 (1990) (E).

“A Mean Field Theory of High-Tc Superconductivity: The Superexchange Mechanism”, A. E. Ruckenstein, P. J. Hirschfeld, and J. Appel, Phys. Rev. B 36, 857 (1987).

“New Functional Integral Approach to Strongly Correlated Fermi Systems: The Gutzwiller Approximation as a Saddle Point”, G. Kotliar, A. E. Ruckenstein, Phys. Rev. Lett. 57, 1362 (1986).

For a full list of publications, please see the attached CV.

Education:

  • Ph.D. in Physics, Cornell University
  • M.s in Physics, Cornell University
  • A.B in Physics, Harvard University
  • Degree in Music, Romanian Nation School of Music

Honors/Awards:

  • Fellow of the American Physical Society
  • Senior Humboldt Prize (1994)
  • Fellow of the Sloan Research Foundation

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